2009 CCMA Awards Contest and Banquet

Record turnout for CCMA Awards


More than 200 students from schools throughout the state attended CCMA’s annual awards conference at Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Calif April 17. Each year the California College Media Association holds a competition to honor excellence in student journalism at junior college and university publications.The competition draws hundreds of participants from both large and small schools across the state and is free to member publications.

This year’s awards banquet included a special presentation to Sen. Leland Yee and CAL-JEC Teacher of the year recipient Marcy BurstinerHumboldt State assistant professor of journalism and mass communication.

Winners of this year’s competition are listed below. For a list of the 2008 winners, click here. Check back in the fall for details on the 2010 contest and banquet.

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2009 AWARD WINNERS

Divisions:
A – Daily newspapers
B – Weekly newspapers
C – Published less than weekly newspapers

General Excellence

Div. A
1. The Daily Trojan, USC
This was the clear winner in this division. Great headlines, well-written stories, very clean design, great art. It adds up to a very good, professional newspaper that deserves the respect and admiration of all who read it. Good work!
2. The Collegian, CSU Fresno
3. Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge

Div. B
1. The Golden Gate [X]Press, San Francisco State University
Wow, what a paper. It’s gorgeous, with smart headlines, good art, a lot of local news and user-friendly design.
2. The Orion, CSU Chico
This was almost a dead heat. This is a very good newspaper, with gorgeous design and presentation, and imaginative content. You might be in second place, but not by much.
3. The Guardian, UC San Diego

Div. C
1. City Times, San Diego City College
Good stories, good photos, good headlines, smart captions and gorgeous design. This is a very good newspaper. Congratulations to your staff for producing such a fine example of good journalism.
2. The Sun, Southwestern College
3. The Cuestonian, Cuesta College

Overall Design

Div. A
1. Spartan Daily, San Jose State University
2. The Daily Trojan, USC
3. The Daily Aztec, San Diego State University

Div. B
1. The Guardian, UC San Diego
2. The Orion, CSU Chico
3. The Golden Gate [X]Press, San Francisco State University

Div. C
1. City Times, San Diego City College
2. The Campanil, Mills College
3. None
No Comments

Best News Series

Div. A
1. Tim Miller, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
The series reflects outstanding enterprise by the staff, which worked effectively and collaboratively to produce compelling,  informative and well-written stories about student abuses of ADHD medication. The staff  identified appropriate sources, elicited telling quotes and researched supporting facts, weaving them together into an impressive package. The use of an online survey was an added bonus, and the inclusion of national studies expanded the story beyond the boundaries of the Cal Poly campus. The staff should be commended for its first-rate execution of a controversial topic.
2. Mercedes Aguilar and Cindy Von Quednow, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
3. Tomer Ovadia, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley

Div. B
1. Caitlin Smith, Sara Truitt, Bethany Brendon, The Highlander, UC Riverside
The staffers diligently tracked the unfolding controversy involving the student government president, with a straight-forward approach that effectively held all parties in the debate accountable.
2. Brittney Lyles, The Golden Gate [X]Press, San Francisco State University
3. Delaine Moore, Don Bunce, The Orion, CSU Chico

Div. C
1. Michelle Wiebach, Meg Faulkner, El Don, Santa Ana College; El Don; Sept. 14, 28 and Oct. 19, 2009
This is a well-written and illustrated series that effectively connects readers with the real-life effects of the state budget crisis. The reporters identified appropriate sources, elicited telling quotes and backed up their stories with facts that added to the integrity of the stories. The team is to be especially commended for the third story in the series, which examines the underlying source of the state’s budget woes.
2. Angela Tsai, Vanessa Solis, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
3. Alonzo Ponce, Mark Benton; Paul Ingvaldsen, The Viking, Long Beach City College

Best Breaking News

Div. A
1. Matt Fountain, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Organized and easy to read crime story that explained well what occurred to result in this student’s death.
2. Zach A. Williams, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
3. Evan Sherwood, Daily Nexus, UC Santa Barbara

Div. B
1. Nathan Codd, The Golden Gate [X]Press ,San Francisco State University
Sometimes it’s the weather. Although other reporters had stories on subjects such as fee increase protests, hit-and-run student deaths and student standoffs with authorities, this reporter’s weather story was well-written and well-covered. It included lively quotes, good details and an expert opinion on why so much damage occurred. Best lead too.
2. Yelena Akopian, The Guardian, UC San Diego
3. The Golden Gate [X]Press staff, San Francisco State University

Div. C
1. Kathie Espinoza, El Don, Santa Ana College
Best reported and best written of the bunch. Interviews with all sides, plus students, faculty, and party members.
2. John Servatius, The San Matean, College of San Mateo
3. Lyndsay Winkley, Sean Campbell, The Sun, Southwestern College

Best News, Non-breaking

Div. A
1. Laura Stace, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
When the new athletics director jumps ahead of other faculty on a long waiting list and gets a prime university condo, good journalists ask questions, and that’s exactly what Laura Stace and the Daily Sundial did – lots of them, in fact. This in-depth investigation of preferential treatment on campus covers all the angles, deftly weaving in Southern California’s high cost of housing and the administration’s tepid responses to allegations of favoritism. Also a good example of using, but not relying on, anonymous sources to support a story. Tons of work, good job!
2. Jill Abell, Spartan Daily, San Jose State University
3. Heather Billings, The Collegian, CSU Fresno

Div. B
1. Reza Farazmand, The Guardian, UC San Diego
This provocative, in-depth exploration of two students unfairly evicted from their campus housing shows that good watchdog journalism need not always focus on the huge issues of our day. A well-written, well-organized and thorough accounting of two people wronged by an inflexible system. Good news judgment to go after this story, well done.
2. The State Hornet staff, Sacramento State University
3. Anthony Siino, The Orion, CSU Chico

Div. C
1. Sean Campbell, The Sun, Southwestern College
Good example of taking a step back and taking a thoughtful, comprehensive look at a hot issue, which is what a non-weekly must do. Good use of data to explain the budget cuts in detail; good research to explain “the why”; well-sourced; writing has some voice. Budget was the top educational issue of the year statewide, and you brought it home. Nice work.
2. Vanessa K. Nevarez, The Sun, Southwestern College
3. Frank Cardenas, Michael Jaramillo, Veronica Grant, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College

Best Feature Story

Div. A
1. Javier Panzar, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Javier Panzar’s article took a captivating approach to putting a face on a major local transportation issue. It really drove home the impact that a change in the way the area’s public transit system operates would have on the local population.
2. Cindy Von Quednow, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
3. Alexander Comisar, The Daily Trojan, USC

Div. B
1. Jacob Pierce, City on a Hill Press, UC Santa Cruz
Jacob Pierce’s piece about a local radio station set the tone brilliantly with a description of its interior and went on to paint a wonderful portrait of the station and the people behind it — with a nice bit of history thrown in as well.
2. O.S. Borboa, The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University
3. Brittany Lyles, The Golden Gate [X]press, San Francisco State University

Div. C
1. Wendy Rubick, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
Nice work by Wendy Rubick to show readers the students  behind a nationally recognized video.
2. Hugo Pacheco, El Don, Santa Ana College
3. Lianna Sapien, Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College

Best Editorial

Div. A
1. The Collegian staff, CSU Fresno
Very tightly argued with some clever turns of phrase. Effectively lays out a cogent argument, while anticipating and responding to potential objections.

2. Allison Bailey and Evan Wagstaff, Daily Nexus, UC Santa Barbara
3. Editorial Board, Daily Bruin, UCLA

Div. B
1. Christopher Records, Highlander, UC Riverside
Very thoughtful, well-argued, and well-written.
2. Editorial Board, New University, UC Irvine
3. The Santa Clara staff, Santa Clara University

Div. C
None


Best Personal Opinion Column

Div. A.
1. Roscoe Elliott, Daily Bruin, UCLA
Roscoe’s writing is sharp and to the point. His subject was not only interesting but important and timely to students seeking the value of a college education.
2. Andrew Fingerett, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
“Andrew takes a complicated, what could be dry topic, and makes it interesting and highly readable.
3. None

Div. B
1. Zachary Newcott, The Chimes, Biola University
Zachary has an easy, highly readable way with words and humor that will take him a long way as a writer. From the first graph until the last, he held your attention and often made you laugh.
2. Alnas  Zia , Talon Marks, Cerritos College
3. Ryan Fisher, The Golden Gate [X]press, San Francisco State University

Div. C
1. Angela Van Ostran, The Sun, Southwestern College
Angela tackles sensitive, personal issues with keen insights and a rational that grabs your attention.”
2. Laura Babbitt, The San Matean, College of San Mateo
Laura’s topic, returning to school, is timely and important. She writes from the heart.
3. None

Best Arts & Entertainment Story

Div. A
1. Saba Mohtasham, Daily Bruin, UCLA
Well crafted and researched. Illustrates strong writing for a specialized audience and is a fine example of A&E writing while also illustrating a strong knowledge of the readership.
2. Lauren Barbato, Daily Trojan, USC
3. Michelle Nelson, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge

Div. B
1. Rich Nieva, The Santa Clara, Santa Clara University
A feature on a talented student turned into a think piece on the evolution of music without losing style — or the reader.
2. Alyssa Bereznak, The Guardian, UC San Diego
3. Emily Rome, The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University

Div. C
1. Kathie Espinoza, El Don, Santa Ana College
Anecdotal with a clear central theme that runs throughout while illustrating a deep knowledge of the subject and injecting supporting quotes from excellent sources. Perfect length and timely pop culture subject matter.
2. Amber Sykes, The Sun, Southwestern College
3. Rashida Harmon, The Campanil, Mills College

Best Arts & Entertainment Criticism

Div. A
1. Maggie Owens, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Rant columns are hard to pull off. Too often, it’s just riffing without much substance. That’s why Owens’ column about the Patrick Dempsey perfume is such a delight. It’s perfectly crafted with every sentence advancing the argument. The language snaps with intelligence and humor. A pleasure to read.
2. Hannah Jewell, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
3. Jake Ayres, Daily Bruin, UCLA

Div. B
1. Leila Haghighat, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Haghighat’s review of “Topdog/Underdog” brims with sharply observed insight and details. She really interacts with the material, getting inside it and delivering a review that helps the reader understand and appreciate the show. Great use of language, too. Seriously, this is better than most theatrical reviews I read in major newspapers.
2. Joel Buck, The Chimes, Biola University
3. Diego Celaya, Highlander, UC Riverside

Div. C
1. Rashida Harmon, The Campanil, Mills College
Harmon’s review of “American Idiot” nicely describes the musical with an intelligent, readable style, providing context within the medium and the culture at large. The review had a strong flow and tight, sharp writing.
2. Angela Tsai, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
3. None


Best Sports Story

Div. A
1. Matt Kawahara, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
A well-rounded feature story with a fantastic opening. Very well written. Reads much shorter than it actually is. Lots of different voices and great details about the player’s childhood.
2. Jimmy Tran, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
3. Matt Connolly, Daily Nexus, UC Santa Barbara

Div. B
1. Alexis Terrazas, Golden Gate [X]press, San Francisco State University
Compelling opening with great details. Really could feel the mother’s pain through the description. Good background as well. Gave me a reason to care about the man who was killed.
2. Chris Bennett, The Lumberjack, Humboldt State University
3. Jeremy Vasquez, Coyote Chronicle, CSU San Bernardino

Div. C
1. Almendra Carpizo, The Sun, Southwestern College
This was the best lede of the bunch – by a long shot – and it had great details about the coach being born in a river in Oregon, and about how his step-father was a former Major League pitcher. Also had multiple sources, though I would have liked to see them used a little higher up. There was a lot of coach quotes in the first two-thirds of the story.
2. Ray Peregrina, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
3. Carrol Page, The Campanil, Mills College
Overall comment:
When you are writing a game story from an event that took place 3, 4, 7, 9, 10 days prior, it’s best to featurize the story and sprinkle in game details. It’s less effective to write a straight game story as if it happened the night before, when students often already know the result of the game via internet, TV, etc. And, as far as this competition goes, it’s very difficult to compete with enterprise stories and feature stories when you write a straight-on game story. Pick a player, a theme or another subject to feature and then slip in the details of the game — score, ramifications, etc.

Best Sports Column

Div. A
1. Brantley Watson, Daily Bruin, UCLA
This columnist was able to personalize John Wooden’s birthday despite having never met him. Instead of paying tribute to Wooden by rehashing all of his great accomplishments, we were able to hear a new story that told about Wooden in a new way.
2. Matt Kawahara, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
3. Josh Jovanelly, Daily Trojan, USC

Div. B
1. Matthew Cucuzza, The Santa Clara, Santa Clara
This type of column has been done before, but the author had a good touch on taking a tragedy and relating it to sports.
2. Brian Ensman, The Highlander, UC Riverside
3. Clay Greaney, The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount

Div. C
1. Isai Rocha, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
2,3. None

Best News Photo

Div. A
1. Derek Liu, Daily Bruin, UCLA
The category had three strong finalists.  One of the three was a photograph that made you want to read the story.  Another was the media surrounding a politician who beat a recall.  The winner was an obviously very angry student being separated from a Regent by campus police.  Well cropped, emotion, all the elements were there.
2. Jenina Simplico, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
3. Stefan Armijo, Daily Spartan, San Jose State University

Div. B
1. Aisha Ahal, The Roundup, Pierce College
Three very strong top contenders, but this one took the top spot because it was the moment of victory at the end of the game, well cropped, well lit, lots of emotion.
2. Brian Evangelista, The Highlander, UC Riverside
3. Tony Forte, The Orion, CSU Chico

Div. C
1. Watchara Phomicinda, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
A good photograph of a vehicle accident that took some student lives.  I’m wondering if there were also some of people, some faces, some emotion that might have played well with the photo.  Tell your editor that there needs to be a credit line with the photo.  The editors thought it significant enough for a full page photo on the cover, so there should have been a credit line with it.
2. Mark Rojas, The Sun, Southwestern College
3. Misael Virgen, The Sun, Southwestern College
Should have cropped out the guy on the left and emphasized the other people.

Overall comments:
Too many snapshots, get up close and personal with your subjects, and don’t be afraid to crop tight to eliminate clutter and emphasize your subject and make them the center of attention for the viewer.  Don’t be afraid to use flash fill occasionally.

Best Sports Photo

Div. A
1. Jesus Esquivel, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
The photo caught the moment and emotion of victory, good lighting, cropping, and composition.
2. David Herschorn, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
3. Jonathan Pobre, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge

Div. B
1. Stephen Kirschenmann, The Star, Sonoma State University
Very good action photo, tighter cropping would have made it even better.
2. Erik Jepsen, The Guardian, UC San Diego
3. Kyle Emery, The Orion, CSU Chico

Div. C
1. Russell Scoffin, The Sun, Southwestern College
A very good soccer action photo, good expression. 
2. Russell Scoffin, The Sun, Southwestern College
3. Andrey Miranda, El Don, Santa Ana College

Best Feature Photo

Div. A
1. Maya Sugarman, The Daily Bruin, UCLA
From the wooden beads to the muscular arms to the catchlights in the eyes, Maya presents a striking portrait of free safety Rahim Moore. Excellent lighting and sharp focus have Moore jumping off the page.
2. Anna Hiatt, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Anna’s portrait of Cal football player Mike Mohamed is very dramatic. Portrait photographers are always told that the eyes should be razor sharp. In this image, you feel as if Mohamed is looking directly at you and into your soul. A nice, tight composition beautifully lit.
3. Stefan Armijo, Spartan Daily, San Jose State University
Talk about punch, this photograph has it. The lighting, expression and stance  show the intensity and focus boxer Marc Sanchez has during his training. Stefan’s image is a real knockout.

Div. B
1. (tie) Shannon Schureman, The State Hornet, Sacramento State University
Shannon captures the emotion of an actress portraying Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. The drama created by the lighting, tears and expression is powerful. In this portrait of a Mexican artist, Shannon displays her own artistry.

Scott Roeder, New University, UC Irvine
Scott’s photograph exemplifies a clever idea well executed. The image depicts four athletes as the foundation of the 2009 men’s volleyball team. They were photographed in hard hats on a construction site. The lighting and sharpness are superb. The props, poses and expressions are fantastic. A well-built image!

2. Josh Meador, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Josh exercises his right brain in this creatively eerie portrait of “brain enthusiast” Jacopo Annese. The lighting, blue-green background and “brain matter” give the image much impact.
3. (tie) Amber-Rose Kelly, Roundup, Pierce College
Amber-Rose shows us the grace, elegance, fluidity and movement of two dancers performing a Central Asian dance. At first glance, it appears this is a photo of one woman in movement. But upon reading the caption, you learn there are two women. A colorful and dramatic image.
Brandon Wong, New University, UC Irvine
What could have been a static image of a student playing a violin is given more interest here with the mirror image of Andy Chen practicing his violin. The angle and lighting also combine to create beautiful music in this photograph.

Div. C
1. Blanca Valdivia, El Don, Santa Ana College
2, 3. None

Best Photo Illustration

Div. A
1. Lara Brucker, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
I thought it was well done on many levels. The gradient over the background was done in away where it didn’t overpower the images of the football players that at times can be hard to do. The cutouts of the football a nice touch. Very clean and easy to read.
2. Matt Weir, The Collegian, CSU Fresno
3. Hannah Pedraza, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge

Div. B
1. Ryan Muta, The Orion, CSU Chico
Knowing how hard it is to do something like this, I was very impressed. The way you got the way the person to step out of his own skin, and have it fold up at the ground was very nice and well done.
2. The Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona
3. Louie Heredina, Roundup, Pierce College

Div. C
1. Beatrice Alcala, Mo Torres, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
Nice use of visuals but I would have tried to match the lighting. Also I know how hard it was to cut out blurred people, for next time I would suggest cutting in closer on them and feather the edge. It will eliminate more of the white glow on the people in the back.
2, 3. None

Best Photo Series

Div. A
1. Victoria Chow, Nick Fradkin and Nathan Yan, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Nice photo package!  It really tells the story of that historic day (the inauguration of Obama).  It was good to see the wide, medium and detail photos in this story.  Nice light and angles.  I would like to see captions with these photos.
2. Bryan Cole, The Collegian, CSU Fresno
Small but nice photo package.  It made me want to see more images.  The detail photo of the dirty arm and uniform helps to tell the story of this women’s lacrosse team.
3. Michael Chen, Daily Bruin, UCLA
The lead photo is a good choice for this story.  I would like to see some detail photos in this package.

Div. B
1. Alex Zamora and Nita-Rose Evans,  City on a Hill Press, UC Santa Cruz
It was very tough to choose between first and second place.  Great photos in both entries.  In the first place entry, the photographers were not afraid to get in the middle of all the commotion and get “the moments” during this protest.  Getting close to your subject helps in getting more intimate images.  You can feel the emotions of the participants after looking at these photos.  The detail shot of the handcuffs is nice.  A wide, overall shot of the crowd would help this photo package.
2. Erik Jepsen, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Some great photos in this photo package as well.  The photographer captured the fun of this event.
3. Preston Drake-Hillyard and Satoshi Kondo, The Lumberjack, Humboldt State University
Nice portraits of the people in the homeless camp.  I would like to see more of the camp.

Div. C
1. Christian Millan, The Viking, Long Beach City College
Clearly the best in Division C.  The photographer got a wide, medium and detail shot to tell the story.  I like the graphic elements of the “women’s team practice” photo.  I would like to see some photos of cheering fans or cheering teammates or something of the coach.  Nice photo package.
2. John Fajardo; The Viking, Long Beach City College
Nice job.  Tough assignment to shoot.  I like that you got different aspects of this event, not just the racing.
3. Mauricio Torres, Jessica Herrera and Joe Calatrello, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
Good job.  I would like to see a wide shot to see the crowd at this event.

Best News Page Design

Div. A
1. Jorge Valle, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
• When you’ve got an amazing photo that tells the whole story, you play it big! You can’t help but feel the joy in that moment, and that’s what good news design does. And really, I bet there was nothing else that students wanted to read about that day so a 1-story page works.
• Nice, clean headline treatment that doesn’t detract from the photo.
• Refer rail keeps it simple, isn’t too cluttered and the photos aren’t too busy for the size.
2. Connie Phu, The Daily Bruin, UCLA
3. Jakob Smith, The Collegian, CSU Fresno

Div. B
1. The Orion, CSU Chico
• Good use of a newsy, graphic centerpiece.
• Good headline hierarchy.
• Good crop on the photo downpage.
• I like the rail of briefs.
• I also really, really like the manipulation of the flag at the top of the page to incorporate the ribbon for the tease. That’s a clever way to use the top of the page in an unexpected way.
2. Simone Wilson, The Guardian, UC San Diego
3. Phillip Barnett, The Runner, CSU Bakersfield

Div. C
1. Michelle Wiebach, El Don, Santa Ana College
The paper has a nice, clean flag at the top of the page with lots of space for teasers. The designer is wise not to cram it full of little junky pictures, but instead used one iconic photo up there.
• Bold, dramatic centerpiece incorporates a unique sketch instead of the typical photo. Very appropriate for an analysis story that it was used for. Also, the display headline coordinated in both color and shading with the art. It was simple, and drew readers in without being obnoxious. Pulled the package together.
• Good use of varying column widths and grid.
• Good headline hierarchy.
• Good use of breakouts and teasers to inside.
2. Esmeralda Ramirez, The Sun, Southwestern College
3. Michael Simmons, The Viking, Long Beach City College

Best Sports Page Design

Div. A
1. Jessie Tseng, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Compelling design, great use of photos and white space. Out-of-the-box thinking that really works.
2. Logan Hopkins and George Stepanoff Jr., The Collegian, CSU Fresno
3. Katherine Maslyn, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley

Div. B
1. Emily Ku, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Tons of information, cleanly presented. Excellent blending of photos for main art element. Consistent design discipline
2. Oscar Chacon, The Orion, CSU Chico
3. Brian Randle, The Orion, CSU Chico

Div. C
1. Beatrice Alcala, The Mountaineer, Mount San Antonio College
Terrific presentation. Solid photo layout.
2. The Argonaut, Notre Dame de Namur University
3. Jermaine Ruvalcaba, El Don, Santa Ana College

Best Features Page Design

Div. A
1. Brittany Paslansky, The Daily Aztec, San Diego State University
Good packaging and a nice use of motif to make average photos pop and more visually interesting. Nice typography and use of color. Very clean and well done.
2. Valerie Nevens, The Collegian, CSU Fresno
3. Megan Hamilton, Spartan Daily, San Jose State University

Div. B
1. Emily Ku, The Guardian, UC San Diego
This page was clever, funny and gutsy without being insensitive, vulgar or over the top! There was a lot of information that was packaged very well. I might have made the main story subhead head a little bigger or bolder, but overall this page’s crowning glory was the illustration. There was a clear vision in the art direction, and it showed. It was really well done.
2. Rick Gomez, Talon Marks, Cerritos College
3. Rebekah Beardshear, New University, UC Irvine

Div. C
1. Martha Nguyen, El Don, Santa Ana College
This page was the clear winner. The use of color, the retro vibe and the typography were well executed to the subject matter. This was a simple story on healthy ways to de-stress, and it was handled with humor and sophistication. Great job.
2. Beatrice Alcala, The Mountaineer, Mt. San Antonio College
3. Lisa Bergquist, The Campanil, Mills College


Best Headline Portfolio

Div. A
1. Hannah Pedraza, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
Her headlines are attention-getting, poignant and clever. Shows a knack for making papers fly off the rack
2. Alonso Tacanga, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
3. Arielle Grant, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley

Div. B
1. Heather Chong, The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University
Good word play without being too obvious.
2. Justin Velasco, The Poly Post,  Cal Poly Pomona
3. Michael Bates, The Santa Clara, Santa Clara University

Div. C
None

Best Infographic

Div. A
1. Liz Cunningham, Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Simple, yet sophisticated design clearly presenting the information. Good use of curved shapes in the design to complement the graph information. Font size a little small.
2. Kevin Black, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Clear presentation of the information. Good use of “page tear” effect. Good use of font, although a little large.
3. Brandon Ocegueda, The Collegian, CSU Fresno
Clearly presents the information. Nice use of 3-D chart effect. Nice use of  Photoshop for faded background. Font choice and size a little hard to read.

Div. B
1. The Guardian, UC San Diego
Infographic integrated into an overall page design (good use of Photoshop effects to weave photos, graphics and words together into an cohesive page design). Interesting font choice, works well for infographic section although headline is a little weak. Reproduction a little dark.
2. Chet Hee, The Roundup, Pierce College
Bold infographic with excellent eye control (forcing the reader’s eye down into the story and infographic). Integrated overall design. Restrained but effective use of Photoshop effect (motion blur). Font size for infographic a little large.
3. Emily Ku, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Infographic integrated into an overall page design. Excellent use of font. Excellent eye control. Good use of color, picking up the splash photo’s dominant shade for use in the headline. Reproduction so, so, Photoshop “blacks” and page “blacks” not well integrated.

Div. C
1. Esmeralda Ramirez, The Sun, Southwestern College
Excellent, subtle main illustration. Shows excellent knowledge of Illustrator and Photoshop. Good eye control. Nice use of color. Clear presentation of information. Special effect for headline (Inline shading and shadow) not necessary (overkill).
2. Martha Nguyen, El Don, Santa Ana College
Clear presentation of information. Good knowledge of Illustrator and Photoshop. Subtle use of color.
3. Kathie Espinoza, El Don, Santa Ana College
Bold design, excellent use of color with strong blacks. Good font choices.
Best Cartoon

Div. A
1. Ed Yevelev, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
Excellent drawing. Accompanies article and highlights subject very well.
2. Crystal Hoy, Daily Aztec, San Diego State University
3. Jon Harguindeguy, Daily Titan, CSU Fullerton

Div. B
1. Niven Wilson, The Guardian, UC San Diego
Delightfully creepy cartoon.
2. Oscar Chacon, The Orion, CSU Chico
3. Reza Farazmand, The Guardian, UC San Diego

Div. C
1. Alexander Cooper, El Don, Santa Ana College
Nice handling of subject matter.
2. Danny Morales, El Don, Santa Ana College
3. Gabriel Orendain-Necochea, The Sun, Southwestern College

Best Back to School/Orientation Issue

Div. A
1. Daily Nexus, UC Santa Barbara
Its publication is titled: “UCSB for Freshmen, generously brought to you by the Daily Nexus.” A cartoon-like UCSB student presents information throughout this guide – a list of local beaches, a dictionary of dorm life, how to use online databases, who’s who at the university, famous alumni and their tips and advice, a food guide and more.
2. Daily Titan, CSU Fullerton
3. Daily Bruin, UCLA

Div. B
1. The Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona
As a Cal Poly Pomona alum, the judge played no favorites in selecting Stampede the winner in this category. “Your Guide to Cal Poly Pomona” was far and away the top back to school/orientation publication. Its 44 attractively presented pages were packed with useful, practical and informative articles. Welcome messages from the college presidents, a history of the campus, tips for finding the best parking spots, a campus housing guide, inexpensive on-campus dining options and the best nearby off-campus entertainment attractions are just some of the many articles included. A must-have for any orientation issue is a campus map, and Stampede made an impact with its colorful two-page spread. Well done, Poly Post staff.
2. The Guardian, UC San Diego
3. The Lumberjack, Humboldt State University

Div. C
None

Best Special Section

Div. A
1. Daily 49er, CSU Long Beach
For looking back on 60 years of the newspaper, it would have been easy for the staff to publish some old stories and simply Google to find out what the price of gasoline and milk was in each decade. Instead, the staff selected single stories that shaped the decade and turned to the Daily 49er editors from those periods to write about their experiences, which offered a unique perspective.
2. Daily Trojan, USC
3. The Collegian, CSU Fresno

Div. B
1. The Orion, CSU Chico
Anyone interested in the university’s baseball and softball teams would get a complete scouting report from the Orion’s special section. Of special note, was bobblehead graphic with each of the starting players and their stats. It was well done.
2. Highlander, UC Riverside
3. The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University

Div. C
None

ONLINE

Web Site General Excellence

1. mustangdaily.net, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
The design of the site makes excellent use of typography, white space, and color. There is an above-average number of campus stories above the fold. The use of photos and video on the home page is effective, and the use of social media links to keep readers informed through web services such as Facebook and Twitter is particularly well done.
2. thecampanil.com, The Campanil, Mills College
3. dailysundial.com, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge

Overall comments:
I know that the contest calls for positive feedback for the top entry only, but I had some more critical thoughts regarding the body of entries as a whole. I’m not sure if there’s a context in which it makes sense to share this feedback with the students who run these sites (so if you want to keep this to yourself, that’s fine — a version of this might find its way to my blog at some point). But here are my thoughts:

One of the challenges to judging this category was the homogeneity of the various sites. Nearly all the entrants used one of two services (College Media Network or CoPress) for hosting their sites. I understand that there are convenience and economical trade-offs at work here.

But because the sites that use the same services tend to look and behave similarly, it raises a few meaningful questions. First, how much of what we’re seeing on these sites (particularly in terms of design, layout, and feature functionality) is actually student work? Second, to what extent does relying upon a service provider inhibit innovation and progress? And finally, since student journalism is pre-professional training, are the sites being run by students adequately preparing them for a web-based future?

By way of analogy, it wouldn’t be my expectation that a traditional student newspaper would necessarily have to own and control its printing press to be innovative and successful, but there’s an expectation that a paper-based publication would have broad latitude to determine the format of its printed product (and certainly its news agenda) no matter how its product is printed.

This doesn’t appear to be the case with many of the student news sites I’m seeing today, and that’s a pity. The days of news being printed on dead trees is without question coming to a close, which means that tomorrow’s journalists will need to become more technical, at the very least to get a handle on what’s possible so they know what to ask for from the technical people who work for them.

Best Blog

1. Daily Clog, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
The Daily Clog has spirited and sassy posts daily. The site has compelling content and makes excellent use of photos. I liked the poll at the top of the site, which engages readers. The site also featured a blogroll, recent comments, some social media links, the voices of multiple bloggers, and basic info about the site (about/write/disclaimer/correction links) in a prominent place. The Daily Clog could benefit from a brief mission statement at the top right of the page that lets people know what the blog offers. I would also like to see advertising other than AdSense and additional revenue streams to support the Daily Clog.
2. Sandy Rose, Life, Love and Lust, New University, UC Irvine
Life, Love and Lust has enthusiasm for its topic, frequent postings, and offers good advice in a way that is useful and practical. The blog’s Q&A format creates an instant connection with readers that will build loyalty. Life, Love and Lust has a great banner and author bio with photo, which perfectly suits the blog’s intimate nature. I also liked the social media features on the site. Life, Love and Lust needs a shorter url, and could benefit from an email list. This is a relatively new blog, and I hope that the blogger will continue as she’s started a great site.
3. The Sundial Shutter, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
The Sundial Shutter showcases an amazing collection of engaging photos that create a strong sense of place and that tell the story of CSU students. The site features contributions from many people, which gives the blog extra momentum and balance. The Sundial Shutter needs a 1-2 sentence mission at the top right, a better url, and a stronger sense of who is behind the blog (contributor bios and pics). This blog would also benefit from more frequent postings.

Best Breaking News Online

1. Sacramento State University
This was the best overall combination of story, photos and video. More than any of the other entries, the staff used all of the digital tools to give a the reader a complete picture of a harrowing breaking news story. Capturing the photos of the assault victim being whisked to the ambulance by emergency workers was especially skilled and added weight to the story. The videos, though typical press conference videos, are exactly what would be expected as a breaking story progresses. An excellent effort.
2. CSU Northridge
Great job of getting inside a story of international significance. The staff took great advantage of their connection to Esha Momeni and the extensive video interview really brought her story to life.
3. CSU Fullerton
Is a sports game story breaking news? In this case, yes. The staff did a nice job of bringing perspective to this David-slays-Goliath sports story, a huge event at any school. The nicely edited video was the perfect touch to a thorough story.

Best Multimedia Presentation

1. dailybruin.com, UCLA
Tattoos
The audio is very good, not great is the accompanying photography but it is the best entry earning my 1st place award. This was a well-produced package with a nice mix of interviews.
2. thespartandaily.com, San Jose State University
Transgender student
Nicely produced package but it fell short in the depth of the interviews and in the photos. It was clearly the best subject of all the entries but the coverage was a little thin. The photos had too much physical distance between the subject and the photographer. An intimate story such as this needed photographs with moments.
3. thespartandaily.com, San Jose State University
Hidden public art
Overall comments:
These three clearly rose to the top. Overall, the entries were poorly produced and poorly executed. Problems ranged from poor technical quality — poor audio / video collection to pieces that just weren’t interesting. The Golden Rule: Make it interesting for the viewer.

More questions needed to be asked during the story decision making. Just because you can do a multimedia piece on it doesn’t mean you have to. Sometimes a written story and a photo will do nicely.

Best Use of Social Media

1. Brianna Hart, Sundial Mobile, Daily Sundial, CSU Northridge
Far-and-away, the Daily Sundial did the best job integrating social media into their everyday routine. While other newspapers offered compelling Facebook pages and/or Twitter feeds, no one else brought them together as well as the Sundial. They showed that social media is no longer just an additional step in the dissemination of information, rather a platform that allows students, faculty and others to immerse themselves in all aspects of campus life, including news. The Sundial Mobile is easy to use and as good as or better than some daily newspaper apps.
2. The Daily Clog, The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
The Daily Clog was thorough and professional in the coverage of the Wheeler Hall protest. The ongoing coverage as well as their use of photos, editorial tweets and informational links proved to be very compelling. Their coordination with the editorial team in the office and on the scene was outstanding.
3. The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley
The Daily Cal: Also covering the Wheeler Hall protest, the Daily Cal did a good job offering insight into breaking news. Their 300-follower increase on the day of the protest was impressive.


Magazine

1. Substance Magazine, Spring 2009, Mount San Antonio College
If Maxim were to produce a magazine for college students, they would do well to copy Substance Magazine. Professionally produced, everything from the story selections to the photography is engaging.
2. The Point, December 2009, Biola University
3. The Bull, Spring 2009, Pierce College

ADVERTISING

Best Black and White Ad
1. Daily Titan, CSU Fullerton
Good use of familiar associations to support message.  Ad met the IFSOS good ad (identify, focus, simplify, organize, sell) criteria.
2. Sara Hamling, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Strong visual draws the reader in.
3. The Orion, CSU Chico
Clever idea/strong message.

Best Color Ad
1. Sarah Clifford, The Cuestonian, Cuesta College
Impactful, effective small space ad.  Good advertising is disruptive and these graphics stop you (the reader).  Simple, easy to understand message.
2. The Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona
The color directly supported the message and helped the reader make the connection.  All of us are familiar with “yellow” POST ITS.
3. Jason Cope, Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Basically there are two kinds of newspaper readers; people who paw over every page and skimmers.  If you are selling refrigerators you ought to picture a refrigerator.  

Best Group Promotion
1. The Collegian, CSU Fresno
Ten ads, on a double truck, very appealing visibly for the readers. eye catching.
2. Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Great layout, eye catching ad you’d keep around all week for the schedule.
3. Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Good use of space and visual layout appealing to readers.

Best Sales & Marketing Promotional Material
1. Mustang Daily, Cal Poly SLO
Nice design and use of fonts.  Very easy to read and understand.  Most media kit designs can be overwhelming and almost claustrophobic with page after page of dates, rates, sizes and demos coming at you – but Cal Poly’s excellent use of white space and graphics make this piece a very useful tool for advertisers.
2. Daily Aztec, San Diego State University
3. The Loyolan, Loyola Marymount University

Best Online Ad
1. Daily Titan, CSU Fullerton
Great graphic photo, fun, local style ad.
2. The Poly Post, Cal Poly Pomona
Wish I could have seen color screen shot, but good local design
3. The Orion, CSU Chico
This one I would have liked a screen shot to see the page, but the graphic was compelling to click to the retailer.

Best Online Promotion
1. The Orion, CSU Chico
The Orion’s straight-forward promotion had a clear message and call to action. There was no need to clutter it up with information that was best explained online with the listed URL. It was effective and smartly designed.
2. Daily Titan, CSU Fullerton
The online promotion for the costume contest was effective in its use of art to compliment the event information. They did a good job of highlighting the sponsors, which are often relegated to the bottom of an ad in unreadable size.
3. None